March is Women’s History Month – Selected Resources on Women’s History & Literature

The internet has excellent resources on women’s history and literature. One is a site for the history of U.S. woman’s suffrage, created by the National Women’s History Museum (NWHM). It features primary source documents, lesson plans, speeches, photographs and more related to the long struggle for voting rights for women.

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, seated, and Susan B. Anthony, standing c. 1880-1902 Library of Congress

Elizabeth Cady Stanton, seated, and Susan B. Anthony, standing
c. 1880-1902
Library of Congress

The website Status of Women in the States provides up-to-date data on women’s progress in 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the United States overall, in five key areas: Employment, Education, & Economic Change; Democracy & Society; Poverty, Welfare, & Income Security; Work & Family; and Health & Safety.

From the demographics area of Status of Women in the States

From the demographics area of Status of Women in the States

The University of Virginia has a site that has digitized biographies of women. You can search or browse by name.

Sojourner Truth was an abolitionist and a women’s right activist throughout her life

Sojourner Truth was an abolitionist and a women’s right activist throughout her life

Has equal opportunity in the U.S. been achieved? (Spoiler alert: um, no.) You can access some of the latest stats are here and here. For a look at the global gender gap, you might enjoy this site courtesy of the World Economic Forum.

Simpson-GoodCry-Small

What about women’s literature? This interesting article by senior lecturer in English and Women’s Studies at Penn State explores the differences between “women’s lit” and “chick lit” and discusses the “fiction gap” between men and women.

She notes that “The fact remains that women continue to read fiction by men; but men don’t necessarily read fiction by women,” adding, ”[t]o reach a wider audience over 150 years ago, the Brontë sisters assumed male pen names, as did George Sand, born Amantine Lucile Aurore Dupin, and George Eliot, the pen name of Mary Ann Evans.”

Chick-lit by sayanisarkar at http://sayanisarkar.deviantart.com

Chick-lit by sayanisarkar at http://sayanisarkar.deviantart.com

Meg Wolitzer writes about “The Rules of Literary Fiction for Men and Women” and Esther Bloom explores “When Women’s Literary Tastes Are Deemed Less Worthy.”

This site and this one have annotated lists of links on women writers.

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About rhapsodyinbooks

We're into reading, politics, and intellectual exchanges.
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5 Responses to March is Women’s History Month – Selected Resources on Women’s History & Literature

  1. Beth F says:

    Love that chick-lit poster! Lots of great resources here to explore. Thanks.

  2. BermudaOnion says:

    Love this! It looks like females outnumber males only because we outlive them.,

  3. litandlife says:

    So many great links!

  4. This looks really interesting.

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