March 14 – Celebrate Pi Day!

Pi Day is an annual celebration commemorating the mathematical constant π (the Greek letter pi), the symbol for the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter. Pi Day is celebrated around the world on March 14th since Pi = 3.1415926535…

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Next year will be especially exciting: in the year 2015, Pi Day will have special significance at 9:26:53 a.m. and p.m., with the date and time representing the first 10 digits of pi.

While the American Pie Council (APC) denotes January 23 as National PIE Day, the U.S. Congress recognizes March 14 as PI Day, but both can be celebrated by baking pies.

According to the APC, the first pies were probably made by early Romans, and appeared in England as early as the Twelfth Century. Pie came to America with the first English settlers. The early colonists cooked their pies in long narrow pans calling them “coffins” like the crust was called in England. Among the other benefits of the American Revolution, it brought into common use the word “crust” rather than “coffin.”

How to celebrate? Make your pie big enough to share! “Hand pies” may not be appropriate, as shown by this calculation by Trader Joe’s:

TJ-pie-equation

On the other hand, this “pi pie,” created at Delft University of Technology in 2008 suggests a more share-friendly approach to Pi Day!

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Happy 3.14159265358979323846264338327950288419716939… Day!

wkendcookingThis post will be linked to this Saturday’s Weekend Cooking, hosted by Beth Fish Reads. Weekend Cooking is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share: Book (novel, nonfiction) reviews, cookbook reviews, movie reviews, recipes, random thoughts, gadgets, quotations, photographs. where bloggers share food-related posts. Stop by her blog and see what’s cooking this week!

January 27 – National Chocolate Cake Day

Enough about food I won’t eat! (See my post here, on haggis). Today is the day to talk about food I can almost never resist, i.e., Molten Chocolate Cake.

What could be better than Molten Chocolate Cake with Vanilla Ice Cream? (Well, the answer is obvious: Molten Chocolate Cake with Vanilla Ice Cream With No Calories Whatsoever.) I think this “quick and easy” recipe from Food and Wine by master chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten fills the bill, since no calories are listed.

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Ingredients:

1 stick (4 ounces) unsalted butter
6 ounces bittersweet chocolate, preferably Valrhona
2 eggs
2 egg yolks
1/4 cup sugar
Pinch of salt
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

Directions:

Preheat the oven to 450°. Butter and lightly flour four 6-ounce ramekins. Tap out the excess flour. Set the ramekins on a baking sheet.

In a double boiler, over simmering water, melt the butter with the chocolate. In a medium bowl, beat the eggs with the egg yolks, sugar and salt at high speed until thickened and pale.

Whisk the chocolate until smooth. Quickly fold it into the egg mixture along with the flour. Spoon the batter into the prepared ramekins and bake for 12 minutes, or until the sides of the cakes are firm but the centers are soft. Let the cakes cool in the ramekins for 1 minute, then cover each with an inverted dessert plate. Carefully turn each one over, let stand for 10 seconds and then unmold. Serve immediately.

Note: The batter can be refrigerated for several hours; bring to room temperature before baking.

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BUT: What if you prefer your chocolate cake to have a complementary flavor with it, so it’s not just chocolate goo inside more chocolate? How about caramel goo inside? This recipe for Gooey Chocolate Caramel Cake from Pinch of Yum is outstanding, and what you end up with looks like this:

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Happy Chocolate Cake Day!!

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wkendcookingThis post will be linked to this Saturday’s Weekend Cooking, hosted by Beth Fish Reads. Weekend Cooking is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share: Book (novel, nonfiction) reviews, cookbook reviews, movie reviews, recipes, random thoughts, gadgets, quotations, photographs. where bloggers share food-related posts. Stop by her blog and see what’s cooking this week!

January 25 – Time for Haggis!

January 25, 1759 is the birthdate of the national poet of Scotland, Robert Burns (perhaps best known in the U.S. for his poem and song “Auld Lang Syne”).

Robert Burns

Robert Burns

His birthday is widely celebrated, both in Scotland and around the world, with “Burns Suppers”.

The main dish at a Burns Supper is haggis, a traditional Scottish dish. Burns’s famous poem “Address to a Haggis” is read when the haggis is cut open. Haggis is usually described as a “savory pudding” which contains sheep’s guts (heart, liver and lungs) minced with onion, oatmeal, suet, spices, and salt, stock, and then encased in the animal’s stomach and simmered for approximately three hours. Haggis is often served with “neeps and tatties” (Scots: turnip and potato), boiled and mashed separately, with a glass of Scotch whisky to wash it down.

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Personally, I wouldn’t dream of interacting with Haggis except perhaps in the sport called Haggis Hurling, which involves throwing a haggis as far as possible. The world record for haggis hurling was achieved by Lorne Coltart on 11 June 2011, who hurled his haggis 217 feet.

A Haggis Hurler

A Haggis Hurler

You can learn more about Robert Burns in this short, entertaining video accessible here.

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wkendcookingThis post will be linked to this Saturday’s Weekend Cooking, hosted by Beth Fish Reads. Weekend Cooking is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share: Book (novel, nonfiction) reviews, cookbook reviews, movie reviews, recipes, random thoughts, gadgets, quotations, photographs. where bloggers share food-related posts. Stop by her blog and see what’s cooking this week!

Sunday Treat – National Peanut Butter Lovers Month

sundae2As I’m sure you know, November is National Peanut Butter Lover’s Month.

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I would be sad without peanut butter, and I am not alone. According to the National Peanut Board, the amount of peanut butter eaten in a year could wrap the earth in a ribbon of 18-ounce peanut butter jars one and one-third times. Most of that peanut butter probably comes from consumption in my house. Even Mr. Ed, the talking horse from old tv, ate peanut butter. In order to make the horse look like he was talking, they spread peanut butter inside his mouth, creating a “natural talking movement” every time the animal moved his sticky jaws.

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Another interesting fact is that apparently women and children prefer creamy, while most men opt for chunky. This is certainly true in our house; we are a two-jar family at all times. [It’s even worse than that: we are a two-BRAND family!]

His

His

Hers

Hers

Want more peanut butter fun facts? Check out this very cool peanut butter infographic.

So if there’s all this love for peanut butter, why is it so hard to find peanut butter ice cream? I don’t mean ice cream with Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups in it, I mean actual peanut butter ice cream. It being essential to my happiness, I often just make my own.

There are at least two ways to make it. There is the homemade ice cream method, a recipe for which you can see here.

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But I actually take the lazy road. Here is MY recipe for peanut butter ice cream.

Get a big bowl.

Dump a carton of Breyer’s vanilla bean ice cream into the bowl. (Breyer’s Lactose Free Vanilla works just as well.)

Let it soften.

Stir in a very large glob of peanut butter. Leave some swirly if you want but stir it in so it turns the color of peanut butter.

Put back into a large tupperware container and refreeze.

Well, put most back. Eat the rest.

But wait!

Don’t feel obliged to use up your tupperware! You can try this tasty alternative:

Before refreezing, pour ice cream into an oreo cookie crust and top with either hot fudge sauce or crushed peanut butter cups.

It’s a great quick dessert to make for company or a special dinner!


Happy Peanut Butter Lovers Month!

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wkendcookingThis post will be linked to this Saturday’s Weekend Cooking, hosted by Beth Fish Reads. Weekend Cooking is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share: Book (novel, nonfiction) reviews, cookbook reviews, movie reviews, recipes, random thoughts, gadgets, quotations, photographs. where bloggers share food-related posts. Stop by her blog and see what’s cooking this week!

October 1 – National Homemade Cookies Day

As you may know, I generally feel an obligation to observe national holidays. This is why today we are celebrating National Homemade Cookies Day. Our favorite cookies are Peanut Butter Blossoms (you can find a recipe here) but since those are so overly familiar, today I will feature a fun recipe for kids, Toll House Mouse Cookies. These will enable you to exercise your artistic tendencies, in addition to your gluttonous ones.

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Ingredients:

3 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened

1 1/2 cups granulated sugar

1 cup packed brown sugar

2 large eggs

2 teaspoons vanilla extract

1/3 cup NESTLÉ® TOLL HOUSE® Baking Cocoa

3/4 cup NESTLÉ® TOLL HOUSE® Semi-Sweet Chocolate Morsels

NESTLÉ® TOLL HOUSE® Semi-Sweet Chocolate Mini Morsels

Directions:

PREHEAT oven to 350° F.


COMBINE flour and baking soda in medium bowl.
Beat butter, granulated sugar, brown sugar, egg, and vanilla extract in large mixer bowl until creamy.
Gradually beat in flour mixture.
Remove 3/4 cup dough; set aside. 


BEAT cocoa gradually into remaining dough in bowl.
Stir in 3/4 cup morsels.
Roll chocolate dough into 3/4-inch ball.
Place on ungreased baking sheet and press to 1/4-inch thickness.
Roll chocolate dough into two 1/2-inch balls.
Place each above larger circle and press to 1/4-inch thickness for ears.
Roll reserved white dough into 1/4-inch ball and place in center of large circle for nose.
Repeat with remaining doughs, placing cookies 2 inches apart on baking sheet. 


BAKE for 8 to 10 minutes or until dough is set.
Arrange mini morsels on warm cookies for eyes and one on top of nose.
Cool on baking sheets for 2 minutes; carefully remove to wire racks to cool completely.

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After the cookies are baked, you will want to keep them soft and moist. According to The King Arthur Flour bakers, there is a science to this. (Personally we never have this problem because cookies don’t last long enough to get hard. It’s similar to the problem-we-never-have about how best to keep wine after the bottle has been opened.)

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They recommend you cover the cookie pan loosely with a clean dish towel as soon as the cookies come out of the oven. Once they are just warm rather than hot, wrap them in plastic wrap. Alternatively, you can wrap them airtight with a “cookie softener” or “sugar softener” – a small piece of porous ceramic that has been soaked in water.

A "sugar softener" shaped like a bear

A “sugar softener” shaped like a bear

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Special Note for Gluten-Free People: King Arthur’s store also offers a variety of gluten-free baking mixes. You can also find them at Target, however, along with a variety of Betty Crocker gluten-free mixes.

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Happy National Homemade Cookies Day!

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wkendcookingThis post will be linked to this Saturday’s Weekend Cooking, hosted by Beth Fish Reads. Weekend Cooking is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share: Book (novel, nonfiction) reviews, cookbook reviews, movie reviews, recipes, random thoughts, gadgets, quotations, photographs. where bloggers share food-related posts. Stop by her blog and see what’s cooking this week!

Sunday Treat – Russian Cooking

sundae2In a previous post, I reviewed the entertaining memoir Mastering The Art of Soviet Cooking: A Memoir of Food and Longing by Anya Von Bremzen. Her book enables you to learn about Soviet history while getting a “taste” for what it was actually like.

Soviet Cooking

Today, I want to share a couple of recipes.

The first is for Kotleti, or as Von Bremzen calls them, “Mom’s Russian ‘Hamburgers’.” She writes that there was a time when she had “Kotleti for lunch, kotleti for dinner, kotleti of beef, of port, of fish, of chicken – even kotleti of minced carrots or beets.” Writing that “every ex-Soviet cook has a special trick for making juicy, savory patties,” she includes her mother’s recipe, which is prepared “Odessa-style.” You can get this recipe as well as others if you get the book! There is also a very stylistically beautiful rendition of a kotleti recipe by Olga Oilikki at They Draw and Cook, one of my favorite websites:

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(Click here for a larger, more readable version of this recipe.)

A recipe for syrniki is not among those the author includes at the end of her book, but I am including it because I love them. Eating these ambrosial cheese pancakes was one of the highlights of a trip I once took to Kiev.

Syrniki

Syrniki (syr means cheese in Russian) is a Slavic dish traditionally made with “tvorog,” which is a dry curd cheese similar to farmer’s cheese, which can be used instead. Recipes can be found all over the web, and of course all vary slightly. But basically you’re looking at cheese pancakes. This particular recipe is from NPR.

1 1/2 cups farmer cheese (if unavailable, you can substitute cottage cheese, blended to break up the curds, or ricotta or fromage blanc, but they will require a bit more flour)

3 large eggs

3 tablespoons sugar

1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

Pinch baking soda

Few drops lemon juice

3 to 6 tablespoons all-purpose flour (depending on the type of cheese used)

Butter for frying

Sour cream and berries, jam or compote for serving

Heat a heavy skillet over medium-low heat. Mix together the cheese, eggs, sugar and vanilla. Separately, mix together the baking soda and lemon juice and stir that in as well. Add enough flour to make a thick batter, slightly thicker than pancake batter (the exact amount will vary depending on the type of cheese used).

When the skillet has heated, melt a few spoonfuls of butter in it, and plop down heaping tablespoons of batter. The batter should sizzle slightly. If the batter is too runny to set in little pancakes, add additional flour. Cook until the underside is golden, and the top has dried out slightly and holes are beginning to poke through (this will just take a few minutes). Flip, and brown on the other side (the second side should take less time). Repeat with remaining batter, adding additional butter to the skillet as needed. Serve with sour cream and fresh berries.

Makes 3 dozen pancakes, 4 servings

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To wash it down, I recommend a bottle of Soviet Champagne. I got one in order to do “research” for this post. Jim found it too sweet, so I was forced to finish it myself….

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wkendcookingThis post will be linked to this Saturday’s Weekend Cooking, hosted by Beth Fish Reads. Weekend Cooking is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share: Book (novel, nonfiction) reviews, cookbook reviews, movie reviews, recipes, random thoughts, gadgets, quotations, photographs. where bloggers share food-related posts. Stop by her blog and see what’s cooking this week!

Sunday Treat – The Long Hot Summer Means Time for A “Fruit Cup”!

sundae2No, no, when I say it’s time for a “fruit cup” I’m not talking about a little container of grapes and cherries and stuff. I am talking about the British idea of a fruit cup! As Wikipedia explains:

A fruit cup, also known as a summer cup, is traditionally an English speciality drink designed to be made into a “long drink” [an alcoholic mixed drink with a relatively large volume] with addition of a soft drink such as lemonade or ginger ale. Most commonly, these are gin-based, although there are some varieties based on other spirits such as vodka. The base gin is flavored with various herbs, spices, fruit, and botanicals as well as its strength reduced.”

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I got to know what “fruit cups” were by virtue of accidentally tasting a Pimm’s fruit cup, which was so wonderful I wanted to know more about it. Specifically, I wanted to know: what is Pimm’s anyway? It turns out, after looking it up, I still have no idea!

Pimm, a farmer’s son in England, opened a bar in the City of London in 1823, across from Buckingham Palace and the Bank of England, two great places for potential customers! He started mixing a tonic (a gin-based drink containing a secret mixture of herbs and liqueurs) as an aid to digestion, serving it in a small tankard known as a “No. 1 Cup” – hence its subsequent name.

James Pimm

James Pimm

By the 1860s, Pimm’s was bottled. It is now produced by Diageo, a large company based in London whose other brands include Smirnoff (the world’s best-selling vodka), Johnnie Walker (the world’s best-selling blended Scotch whisky), Baileys (the world’s best-selling liqueur) and Guinness (the world’s best-selling stout). It is also the exclusive international distributor of José Cuervo (the world’s best-selling tequila). They seem to know their alcohol! (“Diageo” is an invented name composed of the Latin word “dias”, meaning day, and the Greek root “geo”, meaning world, and is meant to reference the company giving pleasure every day, everywhere.)

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Pimm’s contains 25% alcohol (50-proof). Most spirits sold today contain 40% alcohol (80-proof), so Pimm’s is a relatively low-alcohol drink. Most commonly, it is mixed with lemonade or a soda like Sprite or Ginger Ale as well as fresh ingredients like cucumber and mint.

In a very humorous article on Pimm’s in “The Wall Street Journal,” the author wrote:

I HAVE NOT BEEN totally honest with my husband regarding my stance on the Pimm’s Cup. He is an Englishman, and to him, this fruity, boozy beverage summons a very particular set of sense-memories: lounging on riverbanks and playing lawn games on those two or three bathwater-warm evenings each year that the English refer to as “summer.” To these people, Pimm’s is sangria and margaritas and caipirinhas all rolled into one, the warm-weather drink to rule them all. To me, it tastes like Skittles dissolved in gin.”

Well, yes, precisely why I like it. Plus, if you get it with cucumbers, you can call it “salad.”

The “New York Times” has also been writing about Pimm’s noting that it is “consumed in ungodly amounts every year at Wimbledon.”

The simplest way to prepare it is to mix up Pimm’s, lemonade and 7Up, and top with a cucumber slice. Or you can consult a more official-looking recipe here, which provides precise amounts, and recommends you pair your Pimm’s Cocktail with a good book. Sounds perfect!

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wkendcookingThis post will be linked to this Saturday’s Weekend Cooking, hosted by Beth Fish Reads. Weekend Cooking is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share: Book (novel, nonfiction) reviews, cookbook reviews, movie reviews, recipes, random thoughts, gadgets, quotations, photographs. where bloggers share food-related posts. Stop by her blog and see what’s cooking this week!

Moveable Virtual Blogger Pub Crawl – Bring On The Cheese!

This week, four bloggers including me will take you on a tour of beer, wine, cheese, and bread suitable for a pub tour. The tour started on Tuesday of this week with this post on beer by Kathy of BermudaOnion. Today I throw some cheese into the mix.

I’m not going to MAKE cheese – how odd of you even to think so! – but I am going to introduce two of my very favorite cheeses, since they fit into my favorite food group (i.e., cholesterol).

The first cheese is from Beecher’s in Seattle and New York, but you can order it online. You can also sometimes find it in gourmet stores, by checking out Beecher’s handy locator guide.

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The Beecher’s website features not only products, but guidelines for pairing wine and cheese, in the unlikely event our blog posts don’t fully satisfy your needs in that regard. Then they have lots of cheese info in a Cheese Library (oh, to be the librarian of such a library!)

My favorite cheese from Beecher’s is the Marco Polo. As the website reports:

Beecher’s Marco Polo takes lightly milled green and black peppercorns and blends them with our creamy cheese. The resulting cheese is rich in savory umami and butter notes.”

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Yes! Exactly as I would have described it, especially that part about the “note.”

[Our real description: we love the peppercorns because they make the cheese hot so you have to drink more red wine]

Now, moving on from Beecher’s and back to my newly local neck of the woods, I take you to Brennan’s in Wisconsin. Brennan’s is a gourmet food store sort of specializing in cheese, and one of my favorite places.

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It was Brennan’s that taught me to savor Muenster. Since Brennan’s features fresh-cut prize-winning cheeses, their Muenster tastes nothing like you find in a regular grocery case, but is creamy and floating and ethereal with only a hint of the strong taste you usually find. But okay, it’s only my second favorite cheese from Brennan’s. My first is the Cranberry Cheddar. It’s totally Wisconsin, and totally addictive! As with Beecher’s, you can order cheese online.

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Brennan’s too suggests what to pair with their cheeses, especially since they also sell wine and beer. (And they sell “pie in a bag” and kringle, both also Wisconsin traditions, but I digress. However, lest you, too, are easily distracted, I’ve provided links from where you can order these items as well.)

Finally, we move on to cheese and bread, because that’s where we’re going tomorrow. There are a number of ways to enjoy this combination, such as pizza, grilled cheese, or even French Onion Soup Without The Soup.

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Be sure to stop in tomorrow at the blog of JoAnn at Lakeside Musing, and Friday at the blog of Sandy at You’ve Gotta Read This! for the continuation of the Virtual Pub Crawl!

wkendcookingThis post will be linked to this Saturday’s Weekend Cooking, hosted by Beth Fish Reads. Weekend Cooking is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share: Book (novel, nonfiction) reviews, cookbook reviews, movie reviews, recipes, random thoughts, gadgets, quotations, photographs. where bloggers share food-related posts. Stop by her blog and see what’s cooking this week!

Red, White, and Blue on The Fourth of July!

What better way to celebrate The Fourth of July than by having something red, white, and blue (the white referring to whipped cream, ice cream, or even just sugar, of course).

As I observed in a previous post, the American Congress actually voted to approve a resolution of independence from Great Britain on July 2nd, 1776. The Declaration of Independence, explaining the decision of the Second Continental Congress, was approved on July 4th. So there’s no reason not to have a more politically correct observance on July 2nd, and celebrate in a gustatory manner on July 4th! (Or what the heck, celebrate both days!)

I know the popular choices are those desserts that look like flags, like this one:

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I, however, prefer a more “sloppy” look, more in keeping with my actual “skills” (or lack thereof.) Therefore, for a great culinary treat, I present several tempting berry recipes in the cobbler family that look like I could actually make them. According to Wikipedia:

In the United States, varieties of cobbler include the Betty, the Grump, the Slump, the Dump, the Buckle, and the Sonker.”

First, we have a probably too-nice looking “buckle” from the King Arthur’s Flour Website, which I include because it combines peaches with the berries, which sounds interesting:

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What’s a “buckle” anyway? The definition given at What’s Cooking America? is:

… a type of cake made in a single layer with berries added to the batter. It is usually made with blueberries. The topping is similar to a streusel, which gives it a buckled or crumpled appearance.”

But wait! “Sonkers” sound pretty good too:

A sonker is a deep-dish pie or cobbler served in many flavors including strawberry, peach, sweet potato, and cherry. … It seems to be a dish unique to North Carolina.”

Not only that, but these “sonkers” are traditionally served with what they call a “dip” or custard sauce. That sounds even more appealing! (Although I would just glom on vanilla ice cream….)

This one looks best to me:

Mary-Macs-Blackberry-Sonker-450

There are some great-sounding variations as well. Here is a recipe for a Apple, Pear, Strawberry and Rhubarb Sonker.

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Does that sound great or what? Just google “recipe” with grunt or buckle or slump or cobbler (I wouldn’t recommend googling dump) and you’ll find myriad tempting possibilities!

Even Cake Spy gets into the buckle/slump/dump/cobbler action!

Even Cake Spy gets into the buckle/slump/dump/cobbler action!

You can also check out this post at Cake Spy to find out more about the cobbler family, including Brown Bettys, Clafoutis, Pandowdies, and Fools! The best part is, most of these desserts (except, obviously, the French Clafouti), are as appropriately American as, well, apple pie!

Great book for your kids to read while you're preparing the dessert!

Great book for your kids to read while you’re preparing the dessert!


Happy Fourth of July!

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This post will be linked to this Saturday’s Weekend Cooking, hosted by Beth Fish Reads. Weekend Cooking is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share: Book (novel, nonfiction) reviews, cookbook reviews, movie reviews, recipes, random thoughts, gadgets, quotations, photographs. where bloggers share food-related posts. Stop by her blog and see what’s cooking this week!

May 15 – National Chocolate Chip Day

According to a recent marketing study, chocolate pulls in $90 billion in global sales annually, $19 billion of it in the United States. Approximately $9 billion of the $19 billion is spent by my household.

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In any event, for some hazy reason probably having to do with marketing, today is “universally acknowledged” (to paraphrase Jane Austen) as being National Chocolate Chip Day. I always try to support national holidays, and thus will do my part.

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By the way, if you are attempting to sound erudite about chocolate, it helps to know that the plant from which it comes – the cacao tree – is pronounced kah-KOW. I just include this because of the way I always used to say, “c-a-c-a-o however it is pronounced.”

Chocolate comes from the cacao tree, which is formally known as Theobroma Cacao.

Chocolate comes from the cacao tree, which is formally known as Theobroma Cacao.

What are the essential properties of a dessert utilizing chocolate chips? In my opinion, the most essential is gooeyness. (In fact, I consider gooeyness the most essential for most food, but I’ll wait for other holidays to tell you about that.)

But you know what? You are going to see zillions of recipes today for chocolate chip cookies to help you celebrate this day, so I’m going to go a little outside the box here and offer two alternatives, both of which are from my recipe pins on Pinterest. (Even if you didn’t know which Recipe Board was mine, you could probably guess since almost every recipe label starts with “Gooey” or “Ooey Gooey” or, of course, “Chocolate.”) Because they come from other blogs, I will just link to them, for your clicking, viewing, and cooking pleasure.

First, for an insane sugar rush to start your day, I present:

Glazed Cinnamon Rolls Stuffed with Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough

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And then later, you will need dessert! And so I present Deep Dish Salted Chocolate Chip Cookie Pie

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Click on the links for wonderful recipe ideas, and wonderful ways to celebrate this important day!

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This post will be linked to this Saturday’s Weekend Cooking, hosted by Beth Fish Reads. Weekend Cooking is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share: Book (novel, nonfiction) reviews, cookbook reviews, movie reviews, recipes, random thoughts, gadgets, quotations, photographs. where bloggers share food-related posts. Stop by her blog and see what’s cooking this week!

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